Blanket of Snow on Mount Haku, Visible From Fukui City

Blanket of Snow on Mount Haku, Visible From Fukui City

Mountain’s First Snowfall, 11 Days Sooner Than Previous Year

On October 17th, Mount Haku (with an elevation of 2702 metres), which spans across Fukui and Ishikawa prefectures, saw its first blanket of snow leading towards the upcoming winter season. The snowy peaks would be seen from within Fukui City. According to the Kanazawa Local Meteorological Office, snow has settled on the mountain 11 days sooner than the previous year, although in line with the average year.

On this day, Fukui Prefecture saw clouds and rain due to the low-pressure system and humid atmosphere. According to the Fukui Local Meteorological Office, with an atmosphere of low resistance towards the incoming cold air, the highest temperatures seen across all 10 observation sites were 3.5⁰C to 7.5⁰C lower than the average year, comparable to November temperatures.

On October 18th, a high-pressure system will cover the areas within Fukui Prefecture. Due to radiative cooling during the early morning, temperatures are predicted to fall below 10⁰C, making for extreme temperature differences throughout the day.

Source: https://www.fukuishimbun.co.jp/articles/gallery/1187152?ph=1

Family of Three Suffer from Food Poisoning Caused by Mushrooms

Family of Three Suffer from Food Poisoning Caused by Mushrooms

Tsukiyotake Mushrooms Mistaken for Hiratake Mushrooms

On October 31st, in Fukui Prefecture, there was a report that three people (of different ages ranging from 60 years old) living in Echizen City ate poisonous tsukiyotake mushrooms, picked from the mountains within the city, resulting in an outbreak of food poisoning. The three are related through family, and ate the mushrooms after being mistaken for the edible hiratake mushrooms (also known as “oyster mushrooms”). After experiencing symptoms including vomiting and stomach pain, they visited the hospital; but having already recovered upon arriving, they were discharged. Food poisoning caused by poisonous mushrooms have been occurring since October 2014.

According to the Fukui Prefecture Pharmaceutical and Food Products – Sanitation Department, on the afternoon of October 27, a man picked mushrooms within the mountains of Echizen City, and brought it home. After stir-frying and eating the mushrooms for lunch, symptoms arose, and the man underwent an examination in a medical institution. The prefecture received a report from the fire department, and upon investigating the remaining stocks of mushrooms, concluded that the man had consumed tsukiyotake mushrooms.

Through summer and autumn, tsukiyotake mushrooms grow en masse on piles of dead trees, such as on the Japanese beech tree. Tsukiyotake is easily mistaken for other edible mushrooms including hiratake, mukitake, and shiitake. When eating, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach pain, and other digestive-related poisoning symptoms can appear from 30 minutes to an hour.

“Food poisoning due to wild mushrooms happens across the country. An ordinary person judging whether or not something is edible is extremely difficult. In situations where you cannot reliably determine if something is safe for consumption, absolutely do not harvest, eat, or give it to anyone, says a prefectural Pharmaceutical and Food Products – Sanitation Department associate.

Source: https://www.fukuishimbun.co.jp/articles/-/964710